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Intercollegiate Athletics

The NCAA, NAIA, NJCAA are the governing organizations of collegiate athletics within the United States. Tennis is one of 30 amateur sports sponsored by these organizations and have produced some of today’s great athletes like James Blake (Harvard), Laura Granville (Stanford), Wesley Moodie (Boise State), Bob and Mike Bryan (Stanford), Peter Luczak (Fresno State) and Amer Delic (Illinois).

Intercollegiate Divisions

National Collegiate Athletic Association

The NCAA endorses three divisions of collegiate tennis within the United States.  Below is a description of each division and the current number of institutions that sponsor a tennis program. Please keep in mind that there is not a lot of interaction between the divisions (they rarely compete against one another).

Note: The top ranked D3 schools offer a very strong level of play equal to many of the D1 programs.

Division I

  • Often described as the “strongest tennis division”.
  • Institutions sponsor at least seven male and seven female intercollegiate sports.
  • Institutions are bound by maximum financial allowances for athletes.
  • 4.5 full scholarships available for men (can be divided partially)
  • 8.0 full scholarships available for women
  • Currently sponsor 264 male and 310 female tennis programs.

Division II

  • Institutions sponsor at least four male and four female intercollegiate sports
  • Institutions are bound by maximum financial allowances for athletes
  • 4.5 full scholarships available for men (can be partially divided)
  • 6.0 full scholarships available for women
  • Currently sponsor 170 male and 213 female tennis programs

Division III

  • Institutions sponsor at least five male and five female intercollegiate sports
  • No financial aid allocated to athletes
  • Mainly smaller universities or colleges
  • Currently 311 male and 360 female tennis programs

 

National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

The NAIA endorses one division of collegiate tennis within the United States. Below is a description of the institutions that are governed by the NAIA.

  • Large variety in athletic and educational standards.
  • Students do not require a SAT score to be admitted.
  • Institutions are bound by maximum financial allowances for athletes.
  • 0 full scholarships available for men (can be divided partially)
  • 0 full scholarships available for women (can be divided partially)
  • Currently sponsor 113 male and 133 female tennis programs.

National Junior College Athletics Association

The NJCAA endorses two divisions of collegiate tennis. Below is a description of the institutions that are governed by the NJCAA.

  • Athletes at NJCAA institutions predominantly compete for two years while completing their academic requirements.
  • After completion of an Associate Degree athletes can transfer to an NCAA Division if they have successfully completed all the academic requirements.
  • NJCAA institutions are relatively inexpensive.
  • Institutions are bound by maximum financial allowances for athletes.
  • 8.0 full scholarships available for men (can be divided partially)
  • 8.0 full scholarships available for women (can be divided partially)
  • Students do not require an SAT score to be admitted.
  • Currently sponsor 50 Division I and 36 Division III men’s tennis programs.
  • Currently sponsor 64 Division I and 31 Division III women’s programs.

Rankings

The NCAA publishes and release singles, doubles and team rankings throughout the year.  Rankings are initially processed by a panel of coaches and will then be determined by a computer-based ranking system.  Each region also publishes and release singles, doubles and team rankings after the fall semester.  These rankings influence the individual national rankings.