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Pathways

LTAD – Tennis Pathway

The Long Term Athlete Development (LTAD) is a systematic approach being adopted by Tennis Canada to maximize potential and increase the enjoyment of participants and athletes in our sport. It provides a framework for developing physical literacy, physical fitness technical, tactical skills and competitive ability, using a stage-by-stage approach. The Tennis Canada LTAD model outlines an optimal development plan based on growth, development and maturation for all individuals to participate in tennis.

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To learn more about each stage of the Tennis Pathway, click on name of the station below. 

Stage 1 – ACTIVE START

Boys/Girls *0-5/6

The overall focus in this stage is to promote a passion for physical activity while laying the foundation for the lifelong enjoyment of sport.

Stage 2 – FUNDAMENTALS

Boys/Girls *5-8/5-9

The most important focus of this stage is to emphasize fun and enjoyment when playing tennis.

Stage 3 – DEVELOPING

Boys/Girls *9-12/9-12

The focus of this stage is building physical literacy through continued development of tennis skills. This stage moves players from kids tennis to full court tennis.

Stage 4 – CONSOLIDATING

Boys/Girls *13-15/12-15

This is a critical stage of development for the athlete/tennis player, as it sets the foundation for learning to be a competitive junior.

Stage 5 – LEARNING TO PERFORM

Boys/Girls *16-18/15-18

The participant has made a conscious decision to pursue a potential career as a “professional player”.

ITF Teenagers in Tennis Report

Stage 6 – LEARNING TO BE A PROFESSIONAL

Boys/Girls *19-23/17-21

This stage integrates and harmonizes the complex diverse factors that contribute to performance in competition.

Stage 7 – LIVING AS A PROFESSIONAL

Boys/Girls *24+/22+

At this stage the full-time athlete is committed and producing consistent performances on demand.

Stage 8 – TENNIS FOR LIFE

Boys/Girls *All Ages

Within this stage, there are three types of participants – the new participant entering at any age, the recreational participant who is active for life, and the competitive (or former High Performance) participant who is no longer training to be professional, but still enjoys competing regularly.