fbpx
EN FR
Home   News   #WhatItTakes campaign takes off, still time to help Canada’s NextGen

#WhatItTakes campaign takes off, still time to help Canada’s NextGen

Jun 26, 2019
written by: Tennis Canada
written by: Tennis Canada
filed in:

Two weeks have passed since Tennis Canada launched its new fundraising campaign called #WhatItTakes and the responses from across the country have been incredible.

In an attempt to support the development of Canada’s future tennis champions, the #WhatItTakes campaign has already raised over $40,000 from donors all over Canada. Moreover, inspired by the pledges made by homegrown talents Bianca Andreescu and Félix Auger-Aliassime to each match every donation dollar for dollar up to $50,000, an anonymous donor has generously pledged to do the same. Combining these thoughtful gifts with the funds already received – the organization has raised over $160,000 to help develop the country’s next generation.

“I believe in Canada’s potential to be a dominant tennis nation,” said Andreescu. “To succeed, we must continue to invest in young talent. I wouldn’t be where I am today without the financial support I received over the last few years. It’s only natural for me to give back to my sport.”

Auger-Aliassime added: “I’m glad to be in a position to support and contribute to the development of younger players, and I want to make it a priority.”

As a non-for-profit, Tennis Canada relies heavily on donations and proceeds from the Rogers Cup presented by National events in Toronto and Montreal to support its high-performance system that has helped produced the likes of Andreescu and Auger-Aliassime.

That’s why campaigns like this one are so important, and there is still time for you to help contribute to those players looking to follow in their footsteps.

More than 10 years ago, Tennis Canada launched a high-performance training system to help aspiring players in Canada fulfill their potential and, in turn, achieve their dreams. Part of that system includes inviting athletes, 14 years of age or older, to train full-time at the world-class National Training Centre (NTC) in Montreal, while also continuing their academic education.

To provide these athletes with the best possible environment to succeed – including internationally-renown coaches, physiotherapists and tutors – Tennis Canada invests somewhere between $50,000 and $100,000 per year for each athlete to nurture their development.

Thanks to generous contributions, the system has been working and the international tennis community has taken notice. But the work is not done. As Auger-Aliassime recently told ESPN: “It isn’t just me and Denis [Shapovalov] — there are other kids coming.”

Be a part of that next generation and donate today at http://www.tenniscanada.com/donate/.