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Timeline: Canadians at Wimbledon

Jul 01, 2017
written by: Tennis Canada

Wimbledon is a special place for Canadian tennis players. Canada is still a long way from being able to compete with England’s tennis history and it’s a challenge just to find a grass court here, but the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club is where we choose to rewrite the history of the game.

2016: Milos’ big moment 

On July 10, 2016, Milos Raonic followed in Eugenie Bouchard’s footsteps and made history as the first Canadian to reach the men’s final of a Grand Slam event. Toppling Roger Federer (6-3, 6-7, 4-6, 7-5, 6-3) along the way, Milos fell to Andy Murray of Great Britain.

2016: Shapovalov takes the crown

As Raonic was rewriting Canadian tennis history on Centre Court, 17-year-old Denis Shapovalov claimed his first Grand Slam junior singles title on Court no. 1, becoming the third Canadian to win a junior major after Eugenie Bouchard and Filip Peliwo in 2012.

In the semifinals, Shapovalov surprised the heavy favourite, Stefanos Tsitsipas of Greece. The Canadian then went on to defeat Alex De Minaur (4-6 6-1, 6-3).

2016: Shapovalov tries to repeat

That same day, Denis Shapovalov and Félix Auger-Aliassime endeavoured to win a second Grand Slam doubles title but were overpowered by Kenneth Raisma and Stefanos Tsitsipas. The year before, the homegrown duo had dominated the US Open.

 

2014: Eugenie’s brush with greatness

On July 5, 2014, Eugenie Bouchard became the first Canadian to reach a Grand Slam singles final. And she did it without dropping a set until she collided with Petra Kvitova of the Czech Republic in the final.

The 20-year-old’s performance propelled her to world no.7—her highest career ranking at the time. Bouchard also surpassed the record set by Carling Bassett-Seguso (world no. 8 in 1985) and became the highest ranked Canadian woman of all time, eventually climbing to no.5.

The tournament was the highlight of an exceptional season for Eugenie, in which she also played in the semifinals of Roland-Garros and the Australian Open. It was only her sixth appearance in the main draw of Grand Slam.

2014: The semis for Milos

Raonic became the first Canadian to reach the semifinals of a Grand Slam event since Robert Powell in 1908 and the very first in the open era. But seven-time Wimbledon champion Roger Federer stopped him in his tracks.

Still, Milos’ performance made him the highest ranked Canadian player of all-time. After Wimbledon, he rose to world no.6 on the ATP Tour, eventually soaring to no.3.

 

2014: Dream week for Pospisil

On July 4, 2014, Vasek Pospisil and Jack Sock of the US caused a surprise upset when they secured the Wimbledon doubles title. Teaming up for the first time, Pospisil and Sock had remained under the radar. In the final, they overwhelmed brothers Bob and Mike Bryan, who were expected to hoist their 16th Grand Slam trophy.

The win (7-6, 6-7, 6-4, 3-6, 7-5) was the first Grand Slam title of Pospisil’s young career. The Canadian rocketed from no. 94 to no.33 in the doubles rankings.

 

2013: Nestor, again!

Daniel Nestor raised another Wimbledon trophy—this time in mixed doubles with partner Kristina Mladenovic of France—with a three-set win over Bruno Soares and Lisa Raymond (5-7 6-2 8-6).

The following year, Nestor and Mladenovic made the final again but were outdone by Max Mirny and Hao-Ching Chang.

 

2012: Bright future for Eugenie

Eugenie Bouchard was flawless on her path to the junior singles and doubles titles. With her 6-2, 6-2 win over Elena Svitolina of Ukraine, she became the first Canadian to win a Grand Slam singles event and rose to world no.2 in the junior rankings. In the doubles event, she and Taylor Townsend of the US ousted Belinda Bencic and Ana Konjuh (6-4, 6-3).

Françoise Abanda, then only 15 years old, also earned a spot in the semifinals of the singles event. It came close to being an all-Canadian final but Abanda was outplayed by Svitolina (7-6(2), 7-6(3)).

 

2012: Peliwo follows suit

If he had played just one day earlier and Bouchard hadn’t made it to the court before him, Filip Peliwo would have become the first Canadian to win a Grand Slam singles title. In the final, he defeated first-seed Luke Saville of Australia (7-5, 6-4). Trailing 5-2 before the rain delay, the Canadian came back in full force to take his first Grand Slam crown. The runner-up at the two previous Slams, Peliwo finally broke the ice at Wimbledon.

 

2011: Eugenie’s doubles domination

Though her singles title only came a year later, Eugenie Bouchard raised her first Wimbledon trophy in 2011 when she dominated the junior doubles event with Grace Min of the US. Together, they got the better of Demi Schuurs and Hao Chen Tang (5-7, 6-2, 7-5) after clawing their way back from two match points.

 

2008 and 2009: Nestor, twice!

In 2008, Daniel Nestor became the first Canadian pro to win a Wimbledon title—the only piece of hardware that was missing from his trophy case. In the final, he and Nenad Zimonjic outmanoeuvred Jonas Bjorkman and Kevin Ullyett (7-6(12), 6-7(3), 6-3, 6-3).

The pair did it again in 2009, ousting twins Bob and Mike Bryan in four (7-6, 6-7, 7-6, 6-3).

 

1996: Robichaud takes the junior doubles title

In 1996, Québecer Jocelyn Robichaud earned the junior doubles title with partner Daniele Bracciali of Italy over South Africans Damien Roberts and Wesley Whitehouse (6-2, 6-4).

 

1990: Doubles glory for Lareau and LeBlanc

In 1990, Sébastien Lareau and Sébastien LeBlanc triumphed in the junior doubles event. The Québecers battled hard and defeated Australians Clinton Marsh and Marcos Ondruska (7-6(5), 4-6, 6-3).